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Tag: ux workshop

One way sticky notes help you build better products

One way sticky notes help you build better projects

Last month on my portfolio I wrote all about being a product designer at local startup Chirpify. One highlight of that case study is a post-up exercise that I held with the team just after I joined the company. That workshop has come up a few times since I posted the case study so I thought a more in depth look at how it worked would be fun. Enjoy!

Sticky notes are an experience designer’s best friends

My favorite part of being a user experience designer is facilitating between people with different roles. I love getting strategists, developers, designers, and managers together in a room, speaking the same language, and solving problems together. This post-up exercise is all about letting the team get their thoughts out and creating a safe space to discuss those thoughts.

So a post-up exercise is a design thinking workshop. A facilitator (you!) guides a group of participants through jotting ideas down on sticky notes and arranging the notes on a wall in ways that provide insight about a problem. There are a lot similar of exercises that UX-ers use in their work. Affinity mapping is one super common exercise that is the base of the post-up. In an affinity mapping exercise you focus on collecting similar ideas together into groups. We’ll also encounter bits of plus/deltas and general brainstorming techniques. I first experienced this exercise while working with the excellent team at XPLANE, a visual thinking consultancy here in Portland. They use plus/deltas as follow-up exercises to see how the team feels at the end of a project. I love to use this exercise as a way to realign a team around common goals and help focus everyone in the same direction.

Exercises like this have a lot of benefits for both your team and your project. Maybe my favorite feature of this post-up format is that it’s introvert friendly. Sometimes in open brainstorming sessions the most extroverted participants can take over (usually on accident!) because the conversation tends to move fast and free. Giving participants a chance to think before expressing to the rest of the team can help quieter teammates feel more comfortable speaking up. Another awesome benefit is you get pollination between teams that sometimes don’t otherwise talk to each other. Having developers hear what the sales team is thinking and worrying about—and vice-versa—is a great way to build empathy within your company. 

Okay, let’s get to it.

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How to Use Persona Empathy Mapping

The really cool thing about this UX Magazine article is that it includes a workshop outline! I <3 workshopping, especially with people from all around an organization. It’s a great way to get people talking to each other in a way that everyone can understand. If I were running this workshop and had tons of room I’d probably set up the empathy maps on the walls ahead of time. That way participants could focus on getting their thoughts out and mapped, instead of setting things up.

How to Use Persona Empathy Mapping

The really cool thing about this UX Magazine article is that it includes a workshop outline! I <3 workshopping, especially with people from all around an organization. It’s a great way to get people talking to each other in a way that everyone can understand. If I were running this workshop and had tons of room I’d probably set up the empathy maps on the walls ahead of time. That way participants could focus on getting their thoughts out and mapped, instead of setting things up.

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